Courses

SEAS offers a wide variety of courses that address different facets of design:

CS179: Design of Useful and Usable Interactive Systems

Usability and design as keys to successful technology. Covers user observation techniques, needs assessment, low and high fidelity prototyping, usability testing methods, as well as theory of human perception and performance, and design best practices. Focuses on understanding and applying the lessons of human interaction to the design of usable systems; will also look at lessons to be learned from less usable systems. The course includes several small and one large project.

ES1: Introduction to Engineering Sciences

An integrative introduction to engineering sciences. Combines classroom discussion with activity-based learning, and emphasizes concepts that span multiple disciplines. Covers topics having direct societal impact, and presents them in historical context. Involves qualitative and quantitative analysis, mathematical modeling, and design. Introduces common engineering software and hardware tools.

Note: This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the General Education requirement for either Science of the Physical Universe or Empirical and Mathematical Reasoning, but not both. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for Science A.

ES20: How to Create Things and Have Them Matter

This aspirational design course teaches students to generate, develop and realize breakthrough ideas in the arts, sciences, and engineering. Students learn basic skills of engineering design, brainstorming, prototyping, and public presentations. Funding is available for continued project development following the course. This year’s theme is "Virtual Worlds."

Note: Open to all students by permission of instructor.

ES21: The Innovator's Dilemma: Finding, building and leading good ideas

Students gain experience overcoming many under-represented challenges of becoming an innovator, including: identifying your intrinsic motivations, finding related good ideas, working effectively with others to develop them, and leading innovative professional projects to implementation. Students apply human-centered design processes (observing, interpreting, ideating, testing, refining, planning) to stimulate innovation, negotiate, strategize, and build and lead cooperative teams. Features guest speakers from industry, academia, and involves collaborating with cutting-edge companies.

ES50: Introduction to Electrical Engineering

A discussion of topics of central importance to the fields of electronics, communications and intelligent systems. The material concerns both qualitative and quantitative analysis, as well as laboratory experiments and computer simulations. Examples of topics to be discussed range from relatively simple modules such as analog amplifiers and digital adders, to complex devices such as cell-phones and their supporting infrastructure.

Note: Students who have taken 100-level courses in electrical engineering will not be allowed to enroll in Engineering Sciences 50. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the General Education requirement for either Science of the Physical Universe or Empirical and Mathematical Reasoning, but not both. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for Science A.

ES51: Computer-Aided Machine Design

A first course in the design and construction of mechanical and electromechanical devices. Engineering graphics and sketching; dimensions and tolerances. Introduction to materials selection and structural design. Machine elements and two-dimensional mechanisms; DC motors. Design methodology. Emphasis on laboratory work and design projects using professional solid modeling CAD software and numerically controlled machine tools.

ES96: Engineering Design Seminar

Project-based class that provides experience in the processes and practice of engineering problem solving and design. Semester-long projects provide training in techniques for problem definition, generation of creative solutions, and decision analysis. Skills covered include oral presentations, technical writing, and team work. Ordinarily taken in the spring term of the junior year.

ES100: Engineering Design Projects

Individual design projects selected to provide experience in the processes and practice of engineering design. Requires proficiency in electronic circuit construction as well as mechanical materials fabrication techniques.
Note: Ordinarily taken in the senior year. This one-term version of Engineering Sciences 100hf is open only to students in special circumstances. Enrolled students are required to file a proposed project form with the Academic Office early in the term. Project approval rests with the faculty Engineering Design Review Board.

ES227: Medical Device Design

Project-based course on the design of medical devices to address needs identified by hospital-based clinicians. Students work in teams with physicians to develop a novel device. The design process includes: needs finding; problem identification; prior art searches; strategy and concept generation; estimation; sketching; sketch modeling; machine elements, ergonomics and prototyping.